http://fc00.deviantart.net/fs71/i/2010/165/7/d/old_book_by_Kuroro7.jpg

The Book of the Great Queen

Today is an auspicious day. I am thrilled to be able to share two announcements that mean the world to me:

1. The Book of the Great Queen to be published by Concrescent Press!

My book project, a comprehensive book on the lore, history, and worship of the Morrígan, now has a publisher: independent esoteric publishing house Concrescent Press. Concrescent is the imprint headed by Sam Webster, M.Div., a brilliant scholar of Pagan studies and the magical arts, as well as an old and dear friend. I am delighted to be working with Sam and Concrescent on this project.

My tentative working title for the book is The Book of the Great Queen. I’m completing the final 5% or so of primary research, and will be completing the writing of the book over the coming months, to deliver by the end of the year.

You can view an early, general topical outline here. As you can see, my intention for the book is to provide a comprehensive and in-depth look at the Morrígan as we know Her through textual, historical, and archaeological sources, Her role and cult of worship in ancient Celtic religion, and to provide guidance for the modern devotional practitioner drawing on these traditions.

And I welcome feedback. What questions related to the Morrígan would you like to see answered in this book?

2. Crowdfunding campaign coming soon!

My second piece of news: We’ve made the decision to go forward with a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for publication and to allow supporters to pre-order the book. I am working with Sam and several more key allies to prepare for the campaign, and we expect to launch in early June.

My hope is that crowdfunding will provide a small but much-needed financial backing to allow me to devote more time over the next several months to finishing the book, as well as covering up-front publication expenses, such as professional editing, illustrations, and layout. I also love the participatory aspect of crowdfunding and look forward to engaging with backers, sharing project updates, sneak previews from the book, and hearing feedback and encouragement.

At present, I’m looking at IndieGoGo as the most likely platform for the campaign – primarily because of its lower fees and availability of PayPal for payments (which some folks have requested). However, if you have an opinion about which crowdfunding platform would make it easier for YOU to back the project, feel free to let me know.

I’ll also be creating some new, original artwork just for the book and the campaign, which will be exclusively available to backers, along with pre-ordering options for the book itself.

I hope this news delights you as much as it does me! Stay tuned to this blog, or my Facebook/Twitter feeds for updates on the book and the campaign.

And may the fires of Beltane bless you and bring you fierce joy!

11 replies
  1. Aileen
    Aileen says:

    Greetings! I am so excited for this book. I have recently had it come up in my own work with the Morrigan and Brighid that they seem to have some sort of relation– the word used with me was “Sister” but whether that is a term of endearment or referencing actual relation of some kind I don’t know. They seem to want to work together through me, to a similar end. Have you heard of or experienced anything along these lines, either personally or in your research? Brightest Blessings~

    Reply
    • Morpheus
      Morpheus says:

      Aileen, it’s very interesting that you mention this! I was told the same thing, actually. The Morrígan told me “You need to know my Sister” and introduced me to Brigid, and that was the start of my relationship with Brigid some years back. I have heard a similar experience from several other people. It seems to be something of a “shared personal gnosis”. Speaking from a scholarly perspective, what’s written in the Irish mythological texts says that Brigid is the daughter of the Dagda, and the Morrígan is one of his two wives. That would make Brigid more a niece to the Morrígan than a sister, strictly speaking. But it’s also the case that there are a lot of conflicting, confused genealogies in those texts, and so the relationships often can’t be taken literally. So I think of them as Sisters in a generalized, spiritual sense – Goddesses who share some kinship with each other.

      Reply
  2. J. W. R.
    J. W. R. says:

    I am so pleased to have come across your blog and I look forward to reading your book. The Morrigan is My Lady, and has been since I was 13 and dedicated myself to her in the only place I had available to me–a Catholic Church in front of a statue of their queen, Mary. It was not quite a temple, but it served its purpose.

    Reply
  3. Jack Naranjo
    Jack Naranjo says:

    I have been looking online for a good book on the Celtic Goddess Morrigan, and came across your site. I am anxious to get a copy of this book when it is published. One question that I would like to see addressed in the book is what effect Druidism had on the worship of Morrigan. Claire French, in her book “Celtic Goddess Great Queen or Demon Witch”, expresses her belief that, in the fifth century BCE, the Goddess was displaced by Druidism and their Celtic sky gods who vied for her possession as spouse. Land and queens became the property of kings, while priestesses were declared witches and exterminated. Do you reach a similar conclusion about the effect of Druidism on the Great Queen and the status of Celtic women?

    Reply
    • Morpheus
      Morpheus says:

      Hi Jack,
      Interesting question. Without having read her actual arguments of course, on the face of it I would say no, definitely not. It is clear from the historical records and contemporary reports that we have, that Druidic religious leadership allowed for high-status women in positions of power. There are a substantial number of women recorded as being important Druidic seers, judges, and ritual leaders, as well as political leaders. Women in Celtic society don’t appear to have been totally equal to men in status and rights, but they certainly had the ability to gain high status and leadership position both socially and religiously. I’m also not familiar with any clear evidence as to a specific time frame (e.g. 5th C BCE) for the advent of Druidism into Celtic religion – I’d be very curious as to what evidence she is basing that on. The language of “the Goddess” being contrasted/opposed to “sky gods” sounds suspiciously like some fairly well discredited theories popularized by authors like Marija Gimbutas and others. As I said, I’d have to look at her arguments and what evidence she’s looking at, but I think it sounds very faulty based on my understanding of history.

      Reply
      • Jack Naranjo
        Jack Naranjo says:

        Hi Morpheus,

        Thank you for your response and insight. I cannot wait to get my hands on a copy of your book.

        I believe that Claire French relies mostly on stories in the Mabinogion, but, some of her critics say she relies on flawed conclusions of Robert Graves.

        Reply
  4. Naali
    Naali says:

    I’m really happy with the presented outline, and I don’t have much of a preference for which crowdfunding site is used. I can’t wait to see more!

    Reply
  5. Christine L Berger
    Christine L Berger says:

    This is all exciting news. First of all you have the best publisher in the world for this work and second I look forward to your crowdfunding and intend to contribute what I can. I prefer kickstarter; there have been issues with Indiegogo recently which made me question wanting to use them. But whichever you choose this is great!

    By the way, Hexenfest and your spear dance brought me more of an awareness of the Morrigan’s presence and was deeply moving.

    Christine

    Reply

Trackbacks & Pingbacks

  1. […] first book, The Book of the Great Queen, was recently published in […]

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *